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Cruisin
Cavalier King Charles Spaniels

Wendell & Cindi Rackler
Oklahoma, USA
580-704-2445

Est. 2005

Ruby Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Puppy

Umbilical Hernia

I can usually tell by seven weeks of age if one of my Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppies is going to have a hernia. On my litter pages I usually add a paragraph around seven weeks to let families know which puppies in the litter have hernias.

Umbilical hernias can be caused by heredity, cutting the umbilical cord too short, or excessive stress on the umbilical cord during delivery or soon after from the dam. The mode of inheritance is unknown, but this condition is minor in comparison to other health issues.

If the umbilical ring does not close immediately after birth sometimes a little fatty tissue is trapped on the outside of the abdomen after the ring closes causing a bubble-like area where the umbilical cord was attached. If the bubble cannot be pushed back up into the abdomen it is called a non-reducible hernia. If the bubble can be pushed back up into the abdomen then it is called a reducible hernia and surgery is advisable if the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel is going to be bred. Most of the time a reducible hernia will turn into a non-reducible hernia as the puppy matures.

Example of an umbilical hernia

Close up of umbilical hernia

The American Kennel Club (AKC) does allow this hernia to be surgically corrected and the dog can still show. The other types of hernias (Inguinal, scrotal or perineal) may not be surgical corrected and still show in AKC conformation.

A companion pet owner need not be alarmed if their new Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppy does have an umbilical hernia. It can easily be corrected during the spay/neuter process or just left as is since majority of the time they pose no threat to the dog. In the unlikely event where an umbilical hernia becomes painful to the touch, red or swollen, take your dog to be examined by a veterinarian as soon as possible.

Keep in mind that umbilical hernias can appear on many different breeds of dogs. Most Cavalier King Charles Spaniel breeders will inform buyers of the condition prior to placement.

An umilical hernia does not lower the value of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppy since it is so common in the breed and a very minor health issue easily correctable.


Inguinal Hernia

The condition is the result of abdominal organs, fat or tissue protruding through the inguinal ring. Inguinal hernias are presented as skin-covered bulges in the groin. They can be bilateral, involving both sides, or unilateral, involving only one side. Inguinal hernias are more common in females than males, but do occur in both sexes. As with umbilical hernias most inguinal hernias will shrink and disappear as the puppy grows, although you must keep an eye on the size of the hernia(s).

An inguinal hernia does not lower the value of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppy since it is so common in the breed and a very minor health issue easily correctable.


Scrotal Hernia

(Affects only male Cavalier King Charles Spaniels) The tube that descends into the scrotum is too large, which allows intestines to descend into the scrotal canal. This type of hernia will also need to be watched carefully and if it does not repair on its own it will need to be fixed during the neutering process.

A scrotal hernia does not lower the value of a Cavalier King Charles Spaniel puppy since it is so common in the breed and a very minor health issue easily correctable.

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